The Job Market for Humanities Majors

The most recent (in 2013, when this article was originally posted) reliable statistics suggest that a major in the Humanities is as competitive as most other fields in the job market. As reported in The Atlantic (click on the excerpt to go the full article):

That’s according to the most recent survey of the college graduate labor market by the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce. As of 2010-2011, the most recent year with available data, recent humanities and liberal arts majors had 9 percent unemployment. That’s right about on par with students in computer and math fields (9.1 percent), psychology and social work (8.8 percent), and the social sciences (10.3 percent). And it’s just a bit above the average across all majors of 7.9 percent.

Remember that 2010-2011 was still in the midst of the Great Recession, so the unemployment rate is still higher than anyone would like, but 9 percent unemployment is far different from much of how the media reports on the job market for humanities majors (which often seem to infer that unemployment is English is more like 91 percent than 9 percent). The media often exaggerates slight differences. It is true, according to this survey, that liberal arts majors do worse than the average of all majors, so that the a liberal arts major as a 91 percent chance of being employed—as compared to the 92.1 percent chance that is the statistical average of all majors.  However, the difference between the employment of liberal arts majors compared to all majors is slight.

The Value of the College Degree

From Huffington Post (click on the excerpt to go to the full article):

People with bachelor’s degrees make around $300,000 more over their lifetimes than those with just a high school education, according to a new analysis by Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. That’s more than triple the value of the degree in 1980, when college grads earned about $80,000 more than those with just high school degrees, the researchers found.

Information Session on Revised English Major

There will be an information session on the revised requirements for the English major on Wednesday, September 10, in 203 Roberts. The session will begin at 11:45 am.

For more information about the revised requirements, see The English Major at UMF.

Where Do English Majors Work

A new chart from the Pew Research Center shows where various college majors end up working. Follow the link to the chart. When you get to the chart, click on the “Non-Stem Majors” category at the top of the chart. Hover over the “Literature and Languages” major on the left, and the interactive chart will show the many places English majors find jobs. Please note how varied and spread across the chart the jobs are, everything from STEM positions to Education to Management to Law.

Faculty Highlights 2014 (Thus Far), More Highlights!

This is the second of several posts from members of the UMF literature faculty reflecting back on the highlights of the previous year.

Misty Krueger:

Publications

• Co-edited a journal issue entitled,“Teaching Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries,” for Persuasions On-Line 34.2 (Spring 2014)

• Published a note entitled, “Teaching Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries,” for Persuasions On-Line 34.2 (Spring 2014)

• Published an article entitled, “Teaching Northanger Abbey as a ‘Crossover’ Text,” in Persuasions On-Line 34.2 (Spring 2014)

Scholarship-in-Progress

• Revising an article submission on Austen’s History of England and her marginalia

• Preparing an essay for article submission on incorporating readers’ theatre into a university course

• Composing an essay on the benefits of creative writing in a literary adaptations course

Invited Lecture

• Invited by the state’s chapter of the Jane Austen Society of North America to speak in Brunswick, ME, about Austen’s novel, Mansfield Park, Elizabeth Inchbald’s play, Lovers’ Vows, and the use of readers’ theatre in the classroom

Conferences

• Attended the MLA convention in Chicago, IL

At the Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference in Knoxville, TN:
• Presented on a roundtable discussion about teaching 18th-century literature through creative writing

• Chaired a panel on Restoration drama

• Performed scenes from an 18th-century play

At the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference in Williamsburg, VA:

• Chaired two panels on mourning in the long 18th century

• Performed scenes from a Restoration drama and participated in a roundtable on drama

• Presented on staging Elizabeth Inchbald’s play, Lovers’ Vows, in a Jane Austen seminar

Mentoring

• Served as a mentor to a UMF Wilson Scholar

New Courses Taught

• Taught a special topics course, English 377: Adaptations of 17th- through 19th-century Literature

• Taught a new section of English 100: Art as Social Critique

Critical Thinking Rubric

• Designed a rubric for the UMF General Education Program’s assessment of students’ critical thinking skills

Faculty Highlights (2014 thus far)

This is the first of several posts from members of the UMF literature faculty reflecting back on the highlights of the previous year.

Michael Johnson

The highlight of the year for me was the publication in Feb 2014 of my book, Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos: Conceptions of the African American West, by University Press of Mississippi. A revised and expanded version of a paper on director Quentin Tarintino’s film Django Unchained (presented at the 2013 Western Literature Association Conference) was solicited by the editors of Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies for a special roundtable on the film to be published in fall 2014.

This past spring was a particularly wonderful and intellectually engaging semester. The Why English? series brought us the amazing Sir Christopher Ricks lecture on T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land. One of the other highlights of the year was performing in the staged reading of The Waste Land along with several colleages in the Arts and Humanities. Also, as a member of the various Libra Scholar and University Forum Series committees, I participated in bringing several engaging speakers and distinguished scholars to UMF throughout the semester: Mary Louise Pratt, Annette Kolodny, and Lisa Brooks. For the Annette Kolodny visit, Prof. Sabine Klein and I collaborated with University of Southern Maine professor Lorrayne Carroll on a Libra Scholar proposal to bring Prof. Kolodny to spend time at both campuses. Prof. Klein and I both spoke at an event honoring Dr. Kolodny sponsored by the University of New England and hosted by UNE Prof. Jennifer Tuttle at the Maine Women Writer’s Collection. Another enjoyable collaboration was with UMF’s Prof. Stephen Pane on his Beethoven’s Opus 111 and “late style” project. As part of the project, I gave a talk on the “late style” of Langston Hughes. Prof. Pane and I, as part of this event, coordinated a group of students in a staged reading of excerpts from Hughes’s late work, the long poem Ask Your Mama, which included joining in with the class to sing “The Hesitation Blues” between sections of the poem. This was, I think, my first public performance singing the blues!

English Courses (2014-2016)

Below is the schedule of literature courses (and faculty assigned to those courses) that we plan to offer from Fall 2014 to Spring 2016. The schedule is tentative and may change.

Fall 2014

ENG 100: Darrohn

ENG 100: Johnson

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Hughes

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Krueger

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Case

ENG 250 Shakespeare: Decker

ENG 251 British Texts and Contexts I: Krueger

ENG 252 British Texts and Contexts II: Hughes

ENG 265 African American Literature and Culture: Johnson

ENG 272 American Texts and Contexts: Klein

ENG 283 Fiction by Women: Case

ENG 341 English Renaissance Literature: Brown

ENG 366 Early American Novel, 1780-1900: Klein

ENG 377 The Within: Darrohn

ENG 455 Literary Theory and Cultural Studies: Johnson

ENG 462 Philosophy and Modern American Literature: Case

Spring 2015

ENG 100: Case

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Krueger

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Johnson

ENG 277 Topics in English: Brown

ENG 250 Shakespeare: Krueger

ENG 252 British Texts and Contexts II: Darrohn

ENG 272 American Texts and Contexts: Case

ENG 273 American Poetry to 1900: Klein

ENG 291 Contemporary Fiction: O’Donnell

ENG 300 Critical Concepts: Johnson

ENG 346 Victorian Literature: Darrohn

ENG 370 The Splendid Drunken Twenties: Johnson

ENG 377 Advanced Topics in English: Case

ENG 477 Seminar Topics in Literature: Krueger

ENG 477 Seminar Topics in Literature: Brown

Fall 2015

ENG 100 Writing Seminar: Case

ENG 100 Writing Seminar: Johnson

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Krueger

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Gunn

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: TBA

ENG 250 Shakespeare: Krueger

ENG 252 British Texts and Contexts II: Darrohn

ENG 272 American Texts and Contexts: Klein

ENG 263 Studies in Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century American Literature: Case

ENG 277 Topics in English: Gunn

ENG 279 Multicultural Literature and Film: Johnson

ENG 300 Critical Concepts: Case

ENG 344 Eighteenth-Century English Literature or ENG 350 English Novel: Gunn

ENG 377 Advanced Topics in Literature: Johnson

ENG 377 Advanced Topics in Literature: Klein

ENG 449 Twentieth-Century British Literature: Darrohn

ENG 481 Early European Literature: Brown

Spring 2016

ENG 100 Writing Seminar: Krueger

ENG 100 Writing Seminar: Darrohn

ENG 100 Writing Seminar: Gunn

ENG 100 Writing Seminar: TBA

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Case

ENG 181 Literary Analysis and Interpretation: Johnson

ENG 250 Shakespeare: Krueger

ENG 300 Critical Concepts: Gunn

ENG 251 British Texts and Contexts I: Krueger

ENG 2xx Course in American Literature: Johnson

ENG 277 Topics in English: Case

ENG 277 Topics in English: Brown

ENG 277 Topics in English: Klein

ENG 362 American Environmental Writing: Case

ENG 377 Advanced Topics in English: Brown

ENG 377 Advanced Topics in English: Darrohn

ENG 477 Seminar Topics in Literature: Gunn

ENG 477 Seminar Topics in Literature: Johnson

 

Commencement 2014 Snapshots

Behind the scenes, faculty getting ready before the ceremony, sometimes arriving wet from the pouring rain:

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After the ceremony, gathering back in the tent (still raining) for pictures:

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Graduating English Majors w/ faculty

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Graduating Creative Writing Majors w/ Faculty

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Humanities Spring Reception 2014

One purpose of the Humanities Division’s Spring Reception is to honor that year’s award and scholarship winners. For 2014:

Wilson Scholarships

Cidney Mayes (sponsored by Misty Krueger)

Nate Sylvester (sponsored by Teal Minton)

Kara Chiasson (sponsored by Eric Brown)

Cadyn Wilson (sponsored by Kristen Case)

Grace Kendall (sponsored by Teal Minton)

Curtis Cole (sponsored by Erin Kappeler)

Sean Igoe & Nicole Lejonhud (sponsored by Pat O’Donnell)

John Buys (sponsored by Sabine Klein)

Lauren Breton (sponsored by Sabine Klein and Clarissa Thompson)

 

SANDY RIVER REVIEW Editor Choice Winners

  • The winner for Spring 2014 is Maileny Guillen for her poem “Bedroom in Arles.”
  • The winner for Fall 2013 is Cadyn Wilson for her nonfiction piece “Hymn.”

BETH EISEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP: Jill Gingras

ELEANOR WOOD SCHOLARSHIP: Kyle Manning.

MAUD L. PARKS AWARD: Kellie Sanborn.

 

Wood and Parks Awards Honorable Mention:

Nicole Byrne

Nicole Clark

Jill Gingras

Carinne Haigis

Taylor McCafferty

Jenna Silliboy

English Major Brunch 2014

English majors and faculty joined each other for brunch to celebrate all of their hard work. Congratulations to the class of 2014!

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